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This Day in History

World History

Sunday, October 11, 1987. :   A huge sonar exploration of Loch Ness in Scotland fails to find any sign of the Loch Ness monster.

     Loch Ness, or Loch Nis in Gaelic, is a large, deep freshwater lake in the Scottish Highlands, which extends for about 37 km southwest of Inverness. It is the second largest loch (lake) in Scotland, with a surface area of 56.4 km2, but is the largest in volume. It is 226 m deep at its deepest point.

For centuries, witnesses have reported sighting a large monster with a long neck in Loch Ness, Scotland. Famous photographs have been proven to be hoaxes, but still the myth of the monster has persisted. On 11 October 1987, "Operation Deepscan", a major sonar exploration of the Loch, was undertaken by a team of 20 cruisers. High-tech sonar equipment bounced sound waves to the bottom of the lake, electronically recording any contacts. Three sonar contacts showed up as crescent shaped marks, but the results of the sonar test did not indicate there was anything unusual on the bottom of Loch Ness.

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