The ATLAS Protected Network Help fight CyberCrime! Choose an ATLAS Protected Network ISP

This Day in History

Australian Explorers

Friday, July 18, 1873. :   Explorer William Gosse sights and names Ayers Rock in an accidental discovery after being forced to take a more southerly route due to lack of water.

     Uluru/Ayers Rock, in central Australia, is the second largest monolith in the world, second only to Mt Augustus which is also in Australia. Located in Kata Tjuta National Park 450 km southwest of Alice Springs, Ayers Rock was given its European name to commemorate the former Premier of South Australia, Sir Henry Ayers. With a circumference of just over 9km, and rising 349 metres above the surrounding plain, Uluru/Ayers Rock is a striking landform.

Explorer William Gosse, of the South Australian Survey Department, became the first European explorer to see Ayers Rock. His expedition into the central interior departed Alice Springs on 23 April 1873, heading in a northwesterly direction. Gosse discovered the rock (now known by its native name of Uluru) by accident during an expedition through Australia's interior. The need to find water for his camels forced him to take a more southerly course than he had originally planned. It was on 18 July 1873 that he sighted Ayers Rock, recording that, "This rock is certainly the most wonderful natural feature I have ever seen".

Receive "Today in History" on your Desktop Receive "Today in History" by EMail
 
Do It Yourself Web Pages. This is a DIY Web Page. Click Here to create your own masterpiece today. Proudly brought to you by Web Management InterActive Technologies Pty Ltd Email: today@wmit.net.au Terms | Prefs | Privacy © 1984-2017 Web Management Do It Yourself Web Pages. This is a DIY Web Page. Click Here to create your own masterpiece today. Proudly brought to you by Web Management InterActive Technologies Pty Ltd